Date of Award

2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Committee Chair

Emil Jovanov

Committee Member

Kerstin Thurow

Committee Member

Aleksandar Milenkovic

Committee Member

Ramazan Aygun

Committee Member

Gregg Vaughn

Committee Member

B. Earl Wells

Subject(s)

Medical informatics., Medical telematics., Medical technology., Human-computer interaction., Wearable computers.

Abstract

Recent technological advances in sensors, wireless networking, mobile and cloud computing promise to fundamentally change the way health care services are delivered and used. The development and proliferation of the wearable physiological monitors enable a shift in healthcare services from centralized hospitals and medical centers to individuals and their homes. Continuous wearable health monitoring has the potential to engage users, improve wellness management, prevent disease by early detection, and assist rehabilitation and treatments. This dissertation presents a general framework and a practical implementation of computing infrastructure (both hardware and software aspects) to support mobile health and wellness monitoring applications as well as services to support further research in the area of wearable health monitoring. Specifically, we focus on a multi-tiered organization of the mHealth infrastructure that includes wearable sensor nodes at Tier 1, personal applications running on mobile computing platforms at Tier 2, and servers and services at Tier 3. We consider several important aspects of the mHealth systems including time-synchronization to support simultaneous distributed real-time monitoring and techniques for quantifying and improving energy-efficiency. These aspects are discussed on each tier of our infrastructure. Finally, the dissertation makes the case and introduces several original mHealth applications that are fully implemented and tested. These include monitoring and capturing dynamic heart response to posture transitions, quantification of timed-up-and-go tests, monitoring of physical activity of wheelchair users, and monitoring of occupational stress of nurses.

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.